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The G935 is Logitech’s newest cross platform, flagship wireless gaming headset, replacing the G933 Artemis Spectrum. Aside from ditching the silly model name this time around, the G935 (See it on Amazon) has received a host of welcome upgrades including updated surround technology, larger drivers, and an upgraded mic, all at a lower price ($169) than the previous model. They’re designed to work as a wireless gaming headset on PC and PS4, but can also be plugged into devices that require a 3.5mm headphone jack, such as an Xbox or mobile device.

Logitech G935 – Design and Features

At first glance, the Logitech G935 Gaming Headset looks identical to the previous model, the G933. However, under the hood there’s been a significant redesign. The G935 now comes with 50mm Pro-G drivers, up from 40mm in the previous model, and they’re contained within a newly designed speaker assembly. Instead of taking the easy (and cheap) way out by just swapping out a new driver on the old assembly in the G933, Logitech redesigned the magnet, voice coil, and enclosure system to work with the new driver. A larger driver can better reproduce lower bass, and with the entirely new assembly design, Logitech has minimized low frequency distortion. With lower distortion, the bass and low mids will sound more natural and clean.

DTS Headphone: X is a surround technology that’s been around for a few years now and is found on many gaming headsets, but now the G935 is stepping up to DTS Headphone: X 2.0. With version 2.0 comes a whole slew of extra features that aim to improve on the surround implementation in headphones. Proximity cues are used to give better distance placement to audio objects such as bullets or footsteps. There’s also enhanced bass support, a 10-channel graphic equalizer, and more clarity to voices in the center channel – perfect for clearly hearing chat from your squad mates.

the G935 is stepping up to DTS Headphone: X 2.0

The G935 weighs just 5g more than the G933 at 379g, and I’d consider both to be on the heavier side for a gaming headset. Thanks to the comfortable ear and headband cushioning I had no difficulty wearing them for hours, but I could definitely feel a relief to my head and neck when I took them off. The leatherette earcups also rotate flat when you take them off, which is a handy feature.

The boom mic hides neatly in the left ear cup and is muted when it’s tucked away. There’s also a mute button on the headset and a red LED will illuminate when the mic is muted. It’s barely viewable in my periphery, but I prefer that to a blindingly bright light in my view. My favorite feature is a storage space in the left ear cup for the USB dongle. Logitech had this on previous generations and I’m so glad they kept it as it solves a simple but persistent problem with wireless headsets.

There are two LED lighting zones on the G935 – a strip down the back side of each ear cup and the Logitech Gaming ‘G’ logo on each ear cup cover. On the left ear cup is a wheel to control volume, a mute button, three assignable buttons and a power switch. The lighting and programmable buttons can all be customized with the new Logitech G HUB software.

This Logitech G Hub software is a ground-up rebuild of the long-standing Logitech Gaming Software that links all your Logitech peripherals. Within the software you can program lighting effects for each zone independently, assign dozens of different options to the buttons including app specific commands (taking a screenshot in Overwolf or muting yourself in Discord), and adjusting audio settings. There are 7 different EQ presets and a 10-band graphic equalizer to customize the frequency response to your liking. Here is where you can turn on DTS and adjust the volume for multiple surround zones on a scale from 0-11 (thanks Nigel Tufnel). The software is incredibly easy to use and very intuitive. Profiles can be set up on a game-specific basis as well.

Logitech G935 – Gaming

Bells and whistles are all fine and dandy, but when it comes to a headset for me it’s all about the sound. Logitech informed me that its audio team went into the redesign process with the intention of creating a balanced frequency response and I can affirm that after using them they have accomplished their goal effectively. Nothing overpowers another sound and there’s excellent clarity across the whole range. In the low end where many headsets suffer from dreaded bass bloat, the G935 stays clean and sounds are easy to delineate. The only frequency drawback is a bit of sibilance in the highs, although I didn’t find that it was piercing or fatiguing over long play sessions. Even with that minor drawback, the G935’s audio easily rivals wireless headsets that cost $200 or more.

Where you might run into some trouble is if you have a smaller head. The ear cups are large and might not seal properly around your ears. That could lead to a loss of bass or, if you sit them further forward on your head, a bit more high tizzyness. They’re also uncomfortable when sitting forward.

The clarity of the sound was evident while playing Battlefront II on my PC. Sometimes I find that the low mids can get jumbled and mushy, especially if any explosions are erupting around me, but that wasn’t the case with the G935s. Everything was nice and clear, so the explosions didn’t cover the heavy blaster fire or low hum of the lightsaber. It made it easier to hear where those sounds were placed around me as well. I generally prefer Dolby Atmos for Headphones over DTS, but X 2.0 might just change my mind. The sound separation is better than the original DTS Headphone: X, and you don’t have to pay for the app like you do with Atmos.

I generally prefer Dolby Atmos for Headphones over DTS, but X 2.0 might just change my mind.

I tried the mic in two different setups, one using the wireless dongle with my computer and the second on my Xbox One X. In both the situations I came through nice and clear to my team, although they all found it to have more high end than they’d like to hear, at least from me. It also tends to pick up some room noise, so if it was constantly on any ambient sounds from my room (especially keyboard clicks) were heard a bit too much. This was more of an issue while on the Xbox since it’s easy to map a push-to-talk key while at the computer. Muting the mic while not speaking is obviously an option, but it also means taking my hands off the controller to reach up to my left ear and hit the mute button.

The G935 is useable on anything you need. Wirelessly it has full functionality on a PC, but my PS4 automatically recognized it with the dongle plugged into one of its USB ports. With Xbox and Switch I used the included 3.5mm cable. In all situations the Logitech sounded fantastic.

Finally, battery life for a wireless headset is always a concern. The last thing you need during a match of Overwatch is to lose all audio. The G935 is rated for up to 12 hours while using it wirelessly and I didn’t need to charge it until my second day of gaming. There is also the option of using it with the 3.5mm cable, which won’t drain the battery at all. There’s a USB charging cable included and the headset can still be used while it’s charging either with the dongle or 3.5mm connection.

Purchasing Guide

The Logitech G935 7.1 Wireless Gaming Headset has an MSRP of $169.99 and is available for pre-order now. It’ll be released on February 25th.

 

The Verdict

Logitech took an already established winner and improved on it. The new drivers are tuned beautifully and the updated DTS Headphone: X 2.0 is a welcome improvement. You can connect it to almost anything and at $170 the Logitech G935 easily rivals the sound quality of headsets that cost $50-100 more.



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